Pacheco’s Disease (PDV)

$20.00

Pacheco's Disease is caused by a herpes virus. Often seen in shipments of imported birds, stress seems to trigger a reaction in a previously asymptomatic carrier or increase the susceptibility of becoming infected. The proximity and stressful nature of shipping appear to contribute to the transmission of the virus.

SKU: PACHECOVIRUS Category:

Description

Pacheco’s Disease is caused by a herpes virus. Often seen in shipments of imported birds, stress seems to trigger a reaction in a previously asymptomatic carrier or increase the susceptibility of becoming infected. The proximity and stressful nature of shipping appear to contribute to the transmission of the virus.

Pacheco’s Disease is transmitted via contact with contaminated food, water, or feces. Less common is airborne transmission. The virus can be contracted from an obviously ill bird as well as from carriers, who appear asymptomatic, but can shed the virus in feces as well as through ocular and respiratory secretions. Examples of species commonly seen as carriers and seem to have a resistance to the virus include Mitred, Nanday, and Patagonian Conures; however, any bird that recovers from Pacheco’s Disease can become a carrier. At risk populations include imported birds, those housed in aviaries and pet stores in large groups, and those in quarantine stations.

 

Symptoms

The incubation period for Pacheco’s Disease is 3-14 days. Unfortunately, the most common symptom is sudden death, with diagnosis confirmed at necropsy. Other symptoms can include diarrhea with a rapid progression to death within 48 hours. One may also see regurgitation, yellow-green urates, and acute central nervous system signs such as tremor, imbalance, or seizures.

Some birds tainted with the infection test positive, however never give clinical hints. Different creatures which test positive may build up a safe reaction adequate to fend off the disease and test negative following 30-90 days. It is highly recommended to re-test all AHV positive fowls 60-90 days after the underlying testing was finished. If the second specimen stays positive, the bird ought to be considered forever infected and most probably will show symptoms in the future.